In the Huffington Post today, religion reporter Jaweed Kaleem looks at the rise in home funerals, and offers a number of compelling stories of families caring for their own after a death. (A warning: the personal stories Kaleem reports on are both inspirational and also truly heartbreaking.)

Do doctors die differently than the rest of us? Maybe.

Following last weekend's piece by Ron Lieber about getting your sh*t together, which we blogged about, the NYT has published an opinion piece by Tim Krieder, "You Are Going to Die."

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This weekend, New York Times writer Ron Lieber shared the story of Chanel Reynolds, whose husband died tragically and suddenly in 2009.

Today we're turning our blog over to Everplans' Contributing Editor Lauren Thaler Kahn. Lauren is the founder of Punchwell Press, an editorial-driven marketing company based in San Francisco. Lauren's mother died in 2010 of pancreatic cancer, and her father died from complications associated with cancer when she was a baby. She blogs about her experience at My Infinity Game.

In today's McSweeney's Internet Tendency (a daily humor site) there's a short piece by Camille Campbell called #Eulogy. It's a fictional eulogy with a darkly funny punch line (which we won't spoil for you here).

In light of the recent changes t​o the tax code, today we're turning our blog over to Victor Adefuye, a lawyer and financial planner, to h​elp us better understand what exactly changed in te​rms of the estate tax and related estate planning taxes in the fiscal cliff compromise.

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The fiscal cliff deal this week impacted tax rates in a range of areas, including in terms of the estate tax (aka the inheritance tax, aka the death tax).

This week in the New York Times, columnist Maureen Dowd turned her column over to Father Kevin O’Neil, a Catholic priest, who has spent much time ministering to the dying and consoling the grieving.

On Friday morning at 9:30 am, sites across the Internet shut down for a minute in memory of the victim's of the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary last week. Though this is not the first time that the Internet has "gone dark" for a cause, this is the first major group action taken online in response to a death (or deaths). Though the Internet provides lots of remote places to grieve—such as message boards, online support groups, and video streaming of funerals—this moment of silence marks a new way of social, communal grieving, and we wonder if this sort of memorialization will become more common in the future.