Uploading Your Brain Into The Cloud And Other Futuristic Predictions

Wednesday, January 4, 2017 • by Gene Newman
digital brain

Everplans Co-Founder Adam Seifer envisions a future where everyone can back up their brain.

WealthManagement.com asked industry leaders to speculate on what sort of technological advancements we can expect in 20 years. Here's a snippet of what Adam had to say about the year 2037:

In the next 20 years, we may be reaching the point where we will be able to upload ourselves into some type of device, whether it’s a robot or the latest version of an Amazon Echo. Mind-blowing as that may be, consider the new problems that will crop up when it comes to “ownership”: How will we make sure our digital selves are managed properly when we aren't available to do it? Upon death, will a spouse be allowed to take ownership of the digital backup and, perhaps, even create a virtual dungeon to torture you for thousands of years?

While this may seem like science fiction now, if someone told you 20 years ago that everyone would have a touch-based mobile device in their pocket that connected them to the entire world, you'd think they were insane. Don't believe us? Let's take a quick journey back to 1997:

  • Titanic was tops at the box office ("I'll never let go, Jack..." *completely lets go*)
  • WebMD recently went online, leading millions to believe that even the most harmless bump was, without a doubt, a tumor.
  • You could catch a new episode of Seinfeld and Friends...on the same night!
  • The Spice Girls were telling the world what they want, what they really, really want. (Editor's Note: Deepest apologies for putting that song in your head.)
  • A Motorola StarTAC cell phone was all the rage and cost around $1,000.
  • Flat screen TVs were starting to hit market for a reasonable $15,000.
  • Google launched a year later in September, 1998.
  • The iPhone was still a decade away from being released.

To further his point, Adam explains how "people are capturing and storing more and more of their lives digitally" making ownership and access to full life recordings "high-stakes topic from an estate perspective." Check out the full story on WealthManagement. com.