Guide: How To Find A Home Cleaning Service

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If the person who died was unattended to for an extended period of time or if the death resulted in the presence of blood or bodily fluids in the home, a licensed biohazard cleaner may be brought in to hygienically disinfect the home and remove any odors that may be present.

What You Need To Know

The funeral home you are working with may be able to put you in touch with a local biohazard cleaning company. In addition, the local police or fire department in your area may be able to provide you with resources for choosing a cleaning company.

Be aware the there are currently no price standards for biohazard cleaning, which means that it may be difficult to determine if you are being charged a fair price for the services you’re receiving. In addition, many biohazard cleaning companies will not give you a price estimate over the phone, as the full extent of the cleaning may have to be assessed before a price estimate can be made. Often, homeowners insurances will cover some of the cost of biohazard cleaning, so you may want to check with your insurance to see what type of coverage you have.

American Bio-Recovery Association

The American Bio-Recovery Association (ABRA) is a non-profit organization that represents over 70 companies in the United States and Canada. In addition, ABRA has certified over 700 individuals in biohazard cleaning. To locate a cleaning company, click the state on the map in which you are looking for a cleaner to see a list of certified cleaning companies in that state. If there are no ABRA-certified cleaning companies in your state, call ABRA’s hotline at 888-979-2272 to locate a certified individual in your state.

State-By-State Health, Legal, And End-Of-Life Resources