Comfort

A viewer of my videos wrote in: "I'm going to a Catholic wake for the first time. Will there be an open casket? What if I'm too nervous to look at the body?"

The death of a celebrity is often a complicated emotional experience for many people. Though we didn't really "know" the person, many of us feel strong connections to our favorite stars. And for young people, these feelings of attachment may be even stronger.

As I headed down to DC for work the other day, my cab driver pointed out something I’d never seen. “See that limo over there?” he said, pointing to a white stretch Towncar emblazoned with a green logo. “It’s from a cancer treatment center. They bring their patients to and from the train station in a limo. Isn’t that nice?” As he spoke, a tall frail woman struggled out of the car, assisted by the driver and an older female companion.

If you've even been on the receiving end of a terminal diagnosis or watched someone struggle with a serious illness, then you know about the identity crisis that strikes when someone becomes sick.

The New York Times has shared a short documentary called "The Caretaker" that looks at the loving, compassionate, and challenging relationship between a caretaker and the elderly woman she cares for.