Blog Archive: March 2013

How did humans die in the 20th century? The folks over at Information is Beautiful asked this question, and answered it with a beautiful infographic depicting the leading causes of death from 1900-2000. (Click on the image to take a closer look.)

Not only does this illustration shed some light on leading causes of death over the last 100 years, but it offers an interesting history of...

I feel the sting of my mother’s absence most acutely at the milestones. In some ways, the milestones, no matter how many years separate them from her death in 2010, make me feel like I’ve just lost her. But in other ways, the milestones that I’ve experienced without my mother bring a new richness, too—just because my mother is gone doesn’t mean that a joyous milestone must be tragic.

Last month Slate re-ran a story from 2011 about a man named Harry, his dog Duke, and the Perfect Day they spent together before Duke died.

This week the Alzheimer's Association released a report stating that 1 in 3 seniors dies with Alzheimer's disease or another type of demetia, a staggering statistic that has the potential to change the way we think about end-of-life planning.

Though dementia can cause death, Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia can also add to a rapid decline in physical (not just mental) health, compounding and intesifying existing health conditions such as heart disease, kidney disease, cancer, and other health problems.

One of the first things my mother did when she was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer was contact an estate attorney. She was always good at planning ahead, and she treated death no differently.