Blog Archive: December 2012

This week in the New York Times, columnist Maureen Dowd turned her column over to Father Kevin O’Neil, a Catholic priest, who has spent much time ministering to the dying and consoling the grieving. Father O'Neil writes that early in his career he used to ask God "Why?" when faced with death: why would a loving, all-knowing, all-powerful God cause pain and suffering? He goes on to ask, "How can we celebrate the love of a God become flesh when God doesn’t seem to do the loving thing?"

And, with his 30 years of experience, Father O'Neil...

On Friday morning at 9:30 am, sites across the Internet shut down for a minute in memory of the victim's of the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary last week. Though this is not the first time that the Internet has "gone dark" for a cause, this is the first major group action taken online in response to a death (or deaths). Though the Internet provides lots of remote places to grieve—such as message boards, online support groups, and video streaming of funerals—this moment of silence marks a new way of social, communal grieving, and we wonder if this sort of memorialization will become more common in the future.

CNN is aggregating a nice collection of tributes from around the world honoring the victims of the Sandy Hook school shooting. People have contributed with personal and creative memorials such as messages in the sand, and poems to those who lost their lives, and the town as a whole. 

 

Even if you are fortunate enough not to be personally affected by the Sandy Hook Elementary School slayings, you've almost certainly been at the receiving end of the relentless, sometimes gruesome media coverage. This has created special issues for families and communities with small children, and particularly for elementary schools. Many school administrations have chosen to be proactive and have scheduled assemblies or class-by-class discussions about the tragedy, in many cases lead by school psychologists and counselors.

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Caring for an aging or elderly parent or grandparent can be emotionally, logistically, and financially complicated. And if you're one of nearly 7 million Americans providing long-distance care, these arrangements be even more challenging.